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A tender and subtly powerful image of a Chinese family preparing and sharing food has won the Pink Lady Food Photographer of the Year for outstanding composition and depth of emotion.

Taken by Chinese photographer Li Huaifeng, the image, entitled Taste, won the overall prize in the annual awards, which received over 10,000 entries from 70 countries.

Taste
Taste, taken by Li Huaifeng in Licheng, Shanxi, shows a young family sharing in the joy of preparing food.

“This picture is technically outstanding in its use of light and composition, but what raises it to the level of historic importance is the depth of its storytelling and emotion. It tells of a year of isolation and living indoors, living in tiny communities of immediate family,” said Caroline Kenyon, director and founder of the awards.

Winners were announced at the end of last month by TV presenter Fred Sirieix in an online awards ceremony. They will be followed by a free exhibition of the winning entries at The Royal Photographic Society in Bristol from 20 November of this year.

The judging panel was chaired by food photographer David Loftus, and included the Guardian’s head of photography Fiona Shields, writer and curator Susan Bright, photographer and president of Champagne Taittinger, Vitalie Taittinger.

Other category winners and highly commended entries included:

Bring Home the Harvest: Category winner

Okra
Drying okra, by F.Dilek Uyar, Turkey.

Women pick okra flowers from the field and arrange them on a rope, then the dried flowers fall and the okra becomes ready to be used in winter.

Food in the Field: Third place

Packing veg
Packing vegetables, by Abdul Momin in Bangladesh.

Farmers are packing cauliflowers and cabbage to send them to markets.

The Politics of Food: Highly commended

Key worker
A key worker in the food industry, by Edmond Terakopian in the UK.

The normal of 'eating out' during the COVID 19 lockdown, has become ordering in, as restaurants are only allowed to be open for deliveries. Bicyclist delivery driver for the online food delivery company Deliveroo, awaits their booking,during the first month of the coronavirus lockdown in London, April 2020.

Food for Family: Highly commended

Dumplings
The whole family make dumplings together, by Ma Jie, China.

The photo was taken in Wangjinzhuang Sijie Village, Hebei Province, China. On December 7, 2020, Cao Liansha (center), aged 89, made dumplings to celebrate the opening of her granddaughter Wang Yixin's (left) dance training school and the sound of happy laughter and cheerful voices were lingering in the happy farm house.

Comments

Granny

1 Month 1 Week

What a fascinating pictorial representation of cultural variations during such an all-encompassing event in 21st century history.

1 Reply

view replies

Comments Editor

1 Month

Really fascinating - every year the images are amazing and so diverse. Glad you enjoyed them too.

0 Reply

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