Guy’s news – The price of a swim in a clean river

The River Dart, which flows past Riverford, was so polluted in the ‘60s and ‘70s that, as the flow dropped in summer, the bottom became covered in several inches of brown slime; we seldom swam past June. The nearby sewage works was the main culprit but farmers and the local tannery were also to blame. Over 40 years of investment – prompted by legislation, grants and occasional prosecution – farms, industry and South West Water have cleaned up the river; an achievement we should collectively celebrate.

The River Dart, which flows past Riverford, was so polluted in the ‘60s and ‘70s that, as the flow dropped in summer, the bottom became covered in several inches of brown slime; we seldom swam past June. The nearby sewage works was the main culprit but farmers and the local tannery were also to blame. Over 40 years of investment – prompted by legislation, grants and occasional prosecution – farms, industry and South West Water have cleaned up the river; an achievement we should collectively celebrate. Today the once fetid Dart is a delight all year for swimmers, fisherman, canoeists and anyone seeking tranquillity on its shaded banks.

25 years ago, pulled by a grant and pushed by tightening legislation, my brother built a huge concrete pit to store cow slurry through the winter until ground conditions allow it to be spread and fertilise the land without fear of pollution. This autumn he is building two sheds; one to store manure under cover to prevent leaching by winter rains, and another to house livestock during wet
winters to prevent damage to soil structure by heavy hooves, and stop faeces running off into water courses. Again there is some grant aid, but also financial benefits from making better use of the manures. Collectively, a desire to do the right thing, the threat of prosecution, and grants have combined to bring progressive improvement in our river and others around the country. I am not
convinced it would have happened without added pressure from EU directives on water quality. It is a knee-jerk response of most farmers to complain about red tape and interference. I would argue that, on our over-crowded island, it is the cost of living in a civilised society with a relatively clean environment.

Guy Watson

A change to our minimum spend
We’ve managed to avoid increasing the minimum spend for years, but delivery costs have risen and the sums are no longer adding up. If you have a veg box, meat box or recipe box in your order, this won’t affect you.
– For all non-meat items, the new minimum spend will be £15
– The meat minimum spend will remain £15
Delivery is still free for everyone!

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

In case you missed it

Your questions
answered.

Ever wondered what rewilding actually means? Or what’s the difference between grass-fed and organic? Put your questions to our experts and have them answer in full.

Learn more