Wicked Leeks issue 5: A force for change

With a theme of positive change and a cover interview with Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, the fifth issue of Wicked Leeks is out now.

It might seem odd to talk about optimism while the UK is deep within a third national lockdown. But that is what the fifth issue of Wicked Leeks magazine has set out to do: to bring a bit of hope and a visual picture of the positive trajectory the world could take post-pandemic. 

As Rob Hopkins, founder of Transition Network, writes in his column (page 6), the power of filling in the sentence ‘what if?’ with a vision of a cleaner, greener world, with fewer cars, better food, more renewables, and less stress, gives people something tangible to latch on to. In a similar vein, our piece on ‘Green jobs for the future’ (pages 16-17) hears from five trailblazers and how you could join them.

And it’s not just individuals but companies, too, that are seeing the potential in a greener world, not all of them as robust as they sound. Our investigation into the rising tide of greenwash (pages 20-21) points out some of the pitfalls around new trends like carbon labelling or net zero targets. In food and farming, there is cause for even more tangible positivity – a new report (page 4) has found that it is quantifiably possible to feed ourselves under a low intensive system, with no chemicals or soya imports for animal feed, while cutting carbon and restoring nature, with the caveat that we need to accept significant dietary change. 

Change is a familiar concept to our cover star, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, who has dedicated his career to TV shows and campaigns to change the world for the better, and in his latest venture, turns his hand to a lifelong guide to healthy eating (pages 10-13).

Elsewhere, in lifestyle, ease yourself into the new year by finding new joy in food and mealtimes (pages 26-27). It may be a little longer before we can re-join friends and family, but for now, a sense of positive change can begin in the home. 

Issue 5 of Wicked Leeks is free and available for all to read via Issuu. Click here to read. 

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